Students Urged To Get Vaccinated Against Meningitis

Public Health England South West are urging students to get vaccinated against meningitis and septicaemia.

Flu Jab

It comes as figures show less than a third of all youngsters leaving school last summer had been immunised with the Men ACWY vaccine by the end of October. 

PHE introduced the vaccination programme in 2015 to tackle a sharp increase in a particularly virulent strain of meningococcal W disease, that poses a high risk for new students. 

Working with Universities UK and the leading meningitis charities, PHE has now updated its guidance to higher education institutions to help them raise awareness amongst students of MenACWY vaccination, and the signs and symptoms of the disease. 

New students, especially freshers, are at a higher risk of meningococcal disease. They mix closely with large numbers of new people, some of whom will unknowingly be carrying the bacteria, without any signs or symptoms, enabling it to spread. 

Last autumn PHE appealed to new students to get vaccinated before starting university or, failing that, soon after arrival. Second year students who missed their vaccination last year are also eligible for immunisation. 

Meningococcal disease can develop suddenly, usually as meningitis or septicaemia. Early symptoms include severe diarrhoea and vomiting, headaches, muscle pain, fever, and cold hands and feet. 

It can kill, or leave people with life-changing disabilities or health problems, like hearing loss, brain damage or the loss of a limb. 

The vaccine, which also provides protection against the Men A, C and Y strains, not only protects those vaccinated, but it will help control the spread of the disease in the wider population. 

Dr Mary Ramsay, Head of Immunisation at PHE, said: ''Many students will have been vaccinated before they left home for university and some will have got vaccinated by their new GP last term. However, for those who haven't, it is not too late. First year students remain at significantly greater risk than most young people from this deadly disease. So I would strongly urge them to go and see their GP to get vaccinated, it could save their life.'' 

Nicola Dandridge, Chief Executive of Universities UK, said: ''There has been an increase in Men W cases among young people and we must do all we can to ensure students are aware of the risks. Many universities have already taken measures to address the issue, with good results. The vaccination process is straightforward and universities up and down the country are making sure that it is as easy as possible for students to get vaccinated.''

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