Huge tarantula found by passenger on London train

14 January 2022, 11:32 | Updated: 14 January 2022, 11:39

A spider was found on a London train
A spider was found on a London train. Picture: RSPCA
Heart reporter

By Heart reporter

A giant spider was found in a box on a commuter train in London last Friday.

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Commuters were left shocked last week when they spotted an unusual guest hopping aboard a train in London.

The giant pink-toed tarantula might normally be found in its native habitat of the South American rainforests, but last Friday one arrived at London Bridge station.

Measuring 3.5cm, the creepy crawly was sitting in a clear plastic box after seemingly being left by its owner.

Luckily, passengers were quick to alert the RSPCA and the abandoned pet was taken to South Essex Wildlife Hospital.

The spider was found at London Bridge station
The spider was found at London Bridge station. Picture: RSPCA

Animal rescue officer Mat Hawkins said: “Passengers got more than they bargained for when they spotted this little guy on the train!

“He was shut inside a plastic tub so we believe he had been abandoned in the carriage.

“Thankfully passengers alerted staff who kept him safe in their office until I could arrive to collect him.”

Mr Hawkins added: “Anyone thinking of getting any kind of pet should do lots of research first, using expert sources, to ensure that the species is right for them and that they can properly meet their needs.”

Anyone with information about the abandoned tarantula has been asked to contact the RSPCA.

What is a pink-toed tarantula?

A pink-toed tarantula is known as an Avicularia avicularia and is native to areas such as Costa Rica, Brazil and the southern Caribbean.

It is not venomous, but does have large fangs and can give a sharp bite which has been compared to a wasp sting.

They have peach-coloured tips on their legs, which are used to help them camouflage in the wild.

They are also thought of as docile creatures and like warm, humid environments.

The Avicularia avicularia is native to Costa Rica and Brazil
The Avicularia avicularia is native to Costa Rica and Brazil. Picture: Alamy

According to the RSPCA, people should think very carefully before deciding to keep tarantulas as pets as they require lots of specialist care.

Their website states: “All pets, including exotic animals, require proper care and attention. But exotics can be more expensive to feed and look after properly and they often require specialist living conditions.

“Some owners keep exotic animals in unsuitable conditions, which cause a variety of illnesses and injuries. It can also be difficult and costly to find a vet who is experienced in treating these animals.”