Workplaces could 'stagger start times and keep staff 2m apart' under possible post-lockdown guidelines

4 May 2020, 10:47 | Updated: 4 May 2020, 11:19

Draft rules for workplaces post-lockdown have been revealed
Draft rules for workplaces post-lockdown have been revealed. Picture: Getty

The draft post-lockdown rules on getting people back to work have been revealed.

Staggering of shifts, ending hot-desking, and asking members of staff to keep two metres apart are all possible new rules workplaces might have to stick to under Boris Johnson's post-lockdown plan.

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As reported by the Financial Times, the proposals have been drawn up by the Business Department (BEIS), and are among a list of draft guidelines that may be given to workplaces when lockdown is eased in the UK.

The rules are intended to offer various different types of workplaces clear guidances from the government on how to operate in a post-lockdown world.

Some workers may be asked to continue working from home to ease pressure on public transport
Some workers may be asked to continue working from home to ease pressure on public transport. Picture: Getty

The report states that workplaces could be asked to stagger shifts, and request that employees steer clear of face-to-face meetings, don't share pens, and stay two metres away from each other (which could be enforced by floor tape).

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It has also been claimed that those working in shops and banks should be protected by plastic screens.

Companies may also be told to increase the number of parking spaces available so that employees don't have to share lifts.

Employees in customer-facing roles could be asked to work behind plastic screens
Employees in customer-facing roles could be asked to work behind plastic screens. Picture: Getty

Office workers might be told to stay at home for months where possible, so as to ease pressure on public transport. If this is the case, the report states that employers should monitor their “mental and physical health”.

The guidelines were distributed on Sunday, and are part of Prime Minister Boris Johnson's 'roadmap' to easing the UK lockdown, which will be officially announced later this week.

Boris Johnson said in the daily press conference last Thursday (30 April) that he will announce a 'comprehensive plan' on getting the economy going, getting public back to work and children in school.

He added: "There will be five key tests that we must satisfy before we can out that plan into action".

These are:

1) Continue to protect the NHS and its ability to cope

2) We must see a sustained fall in deaths

3) We must be sure that the infection rate is falling

4) We have got to overcome the operational challenges on testing and PPE

5) We must all make sure that the measures we take do not risk a second spike that will overwhelm the NHS