Mum shares A&E nurse’s Haribo hack to help determine if a child has broken a bone

7 October 2019, 15:11

One woman has said an A&E nurse shared the hack with her [STOCK IMAGE]
One woman has said an A&E nurse shared the hack with her [STOCK IMAGE]. Picture: Getty
Alice Dear

By Alice Dear

This Haribo hack will help determine if your child has broken a bone, says A&E nurse.

One mum has taken to Facebook to share words of wisdom from an A&E nurse.

Netmum editor Wendy Wood took her daughter Grace, 4, to A&E after the little girl fell during her first day of school.

During her visit, a nurse shared a hack with her which helps access whether a child has broken a bone in their face or not.

She explained to her that you should give your child a Haribo sweet, and that if they can chew it they haven’t broken anything.

The mum took her daughter to A&E after she fell during school
The mum took her daughter to A&E after she fell during school. Picture: Getty

If they can’t, that need to visit a doctors as soon as possible.

Wendy Wood wrote in her Facebook post: “Nifty mum-trick I learned today from a brilliant A&E nurse.

“If your child has bashed their face and you're worried they may have broken a bone, give them a Haribo to chew. If they can't chew it, get to A&E sharpish!"

The nurse said that chewing a Haribo can reveal if a child has broken bones in their face
The nurse said that chewing a Haribo can reveal if a child has broken bones in their face. Picture: Getty

However, not everyone is convinced.

Many people have commented on the post telling people not to use this technique as it is not reliable.

One person wrote: “This is appalling. If they have any broken bones, you are causing more pain; they could even choke on a sweet. They could also have other injuries including concussion.

"This is one of the most stupid and dangerous things I have ever heard. Please do not do this.”

Another added: “I’ve been fortunate enough to work in A&E for most of my working life. Never, in my entire career if parent brought a child to me concerned about a facial fracture would I use a haribo to make a diagnosis. Not at home, not in the playground, not with my own kids.”

Other parents have hailed the hack “genius” with one saying: “I’ll be carrying Haribos everywhere”.