Martin Lewis hits back at claims he caused energy company websites to crash

1 April 2022, 07:59 | Updated: 1 April 2022, 08:00

Naomi Bartram

By Naomi Bartram

E.ON has blamed Martin Lewis for its website crashing ahead of today's energy price cap rise.

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Energy firm E.ON appeared to blame Martin Lewis for its website crashing yesterday.

The company was just one of a number of suppliers to have its website stop working due to the huge number of people trying to submit their meter readings before the energy price cap rise.

Money Saving Expert Martin warned everyone to record an up to date meter reading before today’s price change, so it can be charged under the cheaper rate.

Martin Lewis has hit back at an energy company
Martin Lewis has hit back at an energy company. Picture: ITV

But when one E.ON customer asked why their website was no longer working, the company responded: “Unfortunately the website and phone lines of every supplier are being hammered today.

“Martin has once again created unprecedented demand bringing down Britain. If you respond to our private message providing the details requested then we can assist you.”

This Tweet was later deleted, but not before Martin spotted it and went on to share a Twitter user’s reaction reading: "The cheek of them blaming it on you!"

As of today, the price cap will rise from £1,277 to £1,971 per year, which is an increase of £693 or 54 per cent.

Consumer advice groups urged households in the UK to take a reading and submit it to their provider before the rise to avoid being charged a higher rate.

Martin explained earlier this week: "That way you draw a line in the sand that says to your energy firm, I've only used this amount at the cheaper rate.

"Don't start charging me more on the higher rate and estimating I use some of it afterwards."

This could save the average household around £47 on their energy bills.

Martin Lewis urged people to submit their meter readings
Martin Lewis urged people to submit their meter readings. Picture: Getty Images

Despite the huge increase in prices, Martin has advised that canceling your direct debit might actually cost you more.

"If you're on typical usage, the price cap from 1 April - for somebody paying by direct debit - is £1,971 a year," he said.

"If you want to pay by quarterly bills, and that's what most people ditching direct debit tell me they're thinking of doing, then the price cap is £2,100.

"So that means you're paying over 6% more for the same usage than you do by direct debit, because there is a discount allowed for direct debit."