How to see the Pink Supermoon again today as it lights up sky across the UK

27 April 2021, 10:11

The Pink Supermoon lit up the sky last night
The Pink Supermoon lit up the sky last night. Picture: Getty
Polly Foreman

By Polly Foreman

Stunning pictures of the Pink Supermoon taken last night show it lighting up a number of areas in the UK.

If you missed out on seeing the Pink Supermoon last night, there will be another chance to catch a glimpse of it today.

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The Pink Supermoon can be seen lighting up parts of the UK last night, looking spectacular as it shone over places in the Southwest.

It peaked at 4:31am on Tuesday morning - but it will also be visible through the clouds later today.

The moon in Glastonbury, England, last night
The moon in Glastonbury, England, last night. Picture: Getty

The Royal Observatory in Greenwich has given details of the event, with Astronomer Anna Ross saying: "The average distance of the moon from the Earth is 384,400km, but the moon will reach its closest point this lunar month on 27 April (this Tuesday) at 4.24pm, when it will be 357,379 km away.

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She added, according to Birmingham Live: "This means that the best times to view this supermoon will be anytime during the night of April 27 – when the moon will rise in the east just before sunset and set in the west around sunrise."

The Supermoon was also visible in London
The Supermoon was also visible in London. Picture: PA

The April full moon is called 'Pink' due to the pink phlox flower blossoming at the springtime.

It is a 'Supermoon' this year as it's at its closest point to our planet - meaning it appears about 14% bigger and 30% brighter.


If you missed the Supermoon last night, you might be able to see it later today
If you missed the Supermoon last night, you might be able to see it later today. Picture: Getty

Ms Ross added: "A supermoon is the result of a full moon occurring when the moon is near its closest point to the Earth in its orbit.

"This can happen because the moon orbits the Earth on an elliptical path, rather than a circular one.

"As this means that the moon is a little closer to us, it appears slightly bigger in the sky."

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