IKEA is making vegan meatballs that look and taste like the meat version

9 May 2019, 16:23

Vegan versions of the popular IKEA meatballs will be available in 2020
Vegan versions of the popular IKEA meatballs will be available in 2020. Picture: IKEA

The vegan take on the classic meatball recipe will role out in IKEA stores earlier next year

If you're a vegan and enjoy shopping for reasonably priced flatpack furniture we've got good news - IKEA are rolling out a meat-free version of their ridiculously popular Swedish meatballs.

Not to be confused with the 'veggie balls' they introduced in 2015, which are made from chickpeas, carrots, peas, peppers, and sweetcorn, this new recipe aims to replicate the taste and texture of the meaty product.

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The new animal product-free alternative will be made from a plant-based protein - and will be created in collaboration with some of the leading vegan meat creators.

IKEA will soon sell vegan versions of its popular meatballs
IKEA will soon sell vegan versions of its popular meatballs. Picture: Getty

Managing director at Ikea Food Services Michael La Cour said in a statement: "It is a really exciting industry! Looking at the quality of the products that we have been tasting I am looking forward to serve a delicious plant based meatball made from alternative protein at Ikea."

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"I hope that the many meatball lovers out there will like it as well.

"We know that the Ikea meatballs are loved by the many people and for years the meatballs have been the most popular dish in our restaurants.

"We see a growing demand from our customers to have access to more sustainable food options and we want to meet that need.

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"Our ambition is to make healthier and more sustainable eating easy, desirable and affordable without compromising on taste and texture."