Synthetic alcohol that's HANGOVER-FREE might soon be available

29 March 2019, 12:52

Could synthetic alcohol mean we'll never have to suffer through a hangover again? (Getty
Could synthetic alcohol mean we'll never have to suffer through a hangover again? (Getty. Picture: Getty

By Polly Foreman

The 'synthetic' alcohol won't give the drinker hangovers or cause liver damage, it is claimed

In probably the best news of the millennium, someone is making a 'synthetic' alcohol that doesn't give the drinker hangovers.

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The alcohol, which also doesn't cause liver damage, is said to make the user feel 'drunk' - only without the negative physical side effects.

Hangover-free alcohol is being developed by scientists (stock image)
Hangover-free alcohol is being developed by scientists (stock image). Picture: Getty

It was created by Professor David Nutt, who was government’s chief drug adviser before being fired after claiming that ecstasy and LSD were less dangerous than alcohol. He and his partner David Orren have named it Alcarelle.

Professor Nutt claims that he came up with the concept in 1983 after first discovering an antidote to alcohol in 1983 while he was a PHD student.

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He revealed that he was studying the effects of alcohol on the Gaba system, but found that the antidote was too dangerous. However, he decided to continue studying Gaba receptors and how they react under the influence of alcohol.

Professor Nutt has claimed to have identified Gaba receptors that induce tipsiness while avoiding receptors that result in negative effects like headaches.

He told The Guardian: “We know where in the brain alcohol has its ‘good’ effects and ‘bad’ effects, and what particular receptors mediate that - Gaba, glutamate, and other ones such as serotonin and dopamine,” he said. “The effects of alcohol are complicated but… you can target the parts of the brain you want to target.”

The synthetic alcohol might be approved as a food additive in the next five years (stock image)
The synthetic alcohol might be approved as a food additive in the next five years (stock image). Picture: Getty

If you, like us, haven't the faintest idea what any of the above means, and just want to know when / where this 'hangover-free' alcohol might be available, we have bad news.

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The Alcarelle hasn't actually been through safety tests yet, and has only been tried by researchers in Professor Nutt's lab.

However, the team are attempting to have the molecule regulated as a food additive or ingredient in the next five years, so we'll keep you posted.