Love Island's Rebecca Gormley praised for 'contraceptive patch' - but what are they and how do they work?

22 January 2020, 12:37

Rebecca Gormley appeared to be wearing a contraceptive patch in the villa
Rebecca Gormley appeared to be wearing a contraceptive patch in the villa. Picture: ITV

Love Island newcomer Rebecca Gormley was spotted with what appeared to be a contraceptive patch on her leg - here's everything you need to know.

A screengrab of new islander Rebecca Gormley has caused a stir on Twitter as it appears to show her with a contraceptive patch on her leg.

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Many people have praised Rebecca for normalising the contraceptive method, with one writing: "So happy to see Rebecca on love island wearing a contraceptive patch, so many people don’t know they are a thing and it makes me feel a lot less self conscious about mine now."

A small patch could be seen on new islander Rebecca Gormley's leg
A small patch could be seen on new islander Rebecca Gormley's leg. Picture: ITV

Another added: "People really trying to shame Rebecca for wearing what might be a contraceptive patch on love island, lollll what year are we in".

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As a result, many people have been asking what they are and how to get them - here's everything you need to know.

Rebecca is the newest contestant to enter the Love Island villa
Rebecca is the newest contestant to enter the Love Island villa. Picture: ITV

What is a contraceptive patch?

A contraceptive patch - known as Evra in this country - is a stick on patch that prevents pregnancy in up to 99 per cent of cases if used correctly.

It is a hormonal contraceptive, meaning - like the pill - it releases oestrogen and progestogen to stop ovulation.

The patch also works by thickening cervical mucus, making it more difficult for sperm to move through the cervix. It also thins the womb lining so a fertilised egg is less likely to implant itself.

Each patch lasts for a week, meaning you can change it every week for three weeks before having a break - many women will experience a withdrawal bleed in this period.

You can stick the patch pretty much anywhere on your body, as long as the skin isn't dry, irritated or too hairy.


A contraceptive patch is a relatively lesser-known method of contraception
A contraceptive patch is a relatively lesser-known method of contraception. Picture: ITV

Who can use a contraceptive patch?

The patch can't be used by everyone - it's a no-go for pregnant or breastfeeding mothers, as well as smokers over the age of 35, women taking certain medications, or who have a history of certain illnesses, such as migraines, lupus, heart problems, or blood clots.

Visit the NHS website for more information.

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