Tom Parker in tears as he announces brain tumour is 'under control'

4 November 2021, 07:59

Naomi Bartram

By Naomi Bartram

The Wanted’s Tom Parker has revealed some incredible news about his brain tumour diagnosis.

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Tom Parker has been left in tears after he revealed his brain tumour is ‘stable’ and ‘under control’ following his latest MRI scan.

The Wanted star was diagnosed with a stage four glioblastoma last year, but now he has shared the news that after a routine scan, he is stable.

Tom, 33, took to Instagram to reveal the results to his followers, sharing an emotional post.

Alongside a photo with his wife Kelsey Hardwick and their children - Aurelia, two, and one-year-old son Bodhi - he wrote: "I'm sat here with tears in my eyes as I tell you. We’ve got my brain tumour under control.

"We had the results from my latest scan…and I’m delighted to say it is STABLE. Such a mix of emotions. We couldn’t ask for any more really at this point; a year or so in to this journey.

"Honestly over the moon. We can sleep a little easier tonight."

He added: "Thank you for all your love and support over the last 12+ months. Love from Me,Kelsey, Aurelia & Bo."

Tom Parker has revealed his brain tumour is 'stable'
Tom Parker has revealed his brain tumour is 'stable'. Picture: Instagram

His friends and followers have been quick to comment, with Rebecca Adlington writing: “👏👏 amazing. You are a fighter. Sending so much love.”

“The most AMAZING news! ❤️,” Kimberley Walsh said, while Victoria Derbyshire penned: “You are amazing - and so are the medics xxxxx”.

Someone else added: “Such great news Tom. Ur positivity is inspirational 👏👏👏👏🔥🔥”

Tom found out he had terminal brain cancer in September last year after suffering a seizure.

During his Channel 4 documentary, Inside My Head, Tom revealed he didn’t want to think about the future after his diagnosis.

Tom Parker is back with his The Wanted bandmates
Tom Parker is back with his The Wanted bandmates. Picture: Instagram

He said: "It's so hard to think about the future, I don't want to know.

"I don't think you know how you feel about death until you're faced with it. Am I going to die?

“That's the most important question... I want to stick around - and be the best version I can!"

As part of his treatment, he has since undergone chemotherapy and radiotherapy and hopes to be cancer free by March next year.

He told The Sun: "They give you 12 to 18 months of survival. But that’s the general statistics. Everyone we’ve ­spoken to has been way, way beyond that."